On Humor

article-0-0A6B4B82000005DC-470_468x560Has anyone who wanted to be funnier ever managed to become so?

This semester I’m teaching a class called “Humor and Satire,” and, though we haven’t reached the satire part, I’m beginning to wonder if I understand humor very well. So far, nothing on the reading list, apparently, is funny, and my students’ idea of what’s funny often doesn’t match my sense of humor either.

It occurs to me I might be better off teaching a course called “Humorless Sermons” than one that’s supposed to be funny. No one is laughing as much as I hoped, and, in the middle of the night when I wake up from twisted and disturbing dreams designed to sublimate my frustration, I ruminate on the very nature of humor and what skills or traits (or whatever) a person needs to get a joke and/or whether a sense of humor is inherently subjective, untouchable by education.

Some years ago, during my quixotic teaching years, I devised and taught another course called “The Comic View” and ran into different but similarly nettling issues. Then, students did find some of the content funny, but, beyond sharing what each person thought was funny, they weren’t interested in talking. I’d ask how humor worked—what we can learn about what elicits laughter—and the response would be… crickets. No one wanted to talk about why they were amused.

But at least they laughed at first.

I took over “Humor and Satire”—with considerable trepidation—from a colleague when the class wouldn’t fit into his schedule. He is a director and drama teacher and improv sponsor at our school. Unlike me, he’s quite funny, and, though he helped me design and organize the course and approved the books I chose, thus far I haven’t been able to create the magic he intended.

Why? It might be because I’m not funny or they are not sophisticated enough as readers to detect humor or humor itself is a challenging art form that’s easy to under-appreciate until you try it or maybe that humor, the minute you expose it to the spotlight of analysis, withers and dies. It could be all that and more.

For a recent assignment, I asked my class to write an essay (with the same title as this one) speculating on an essential trait of humor. The elusiveness of the answer, I hoped, would challenge them and—like the laboratory a course like this should be—lead us, together, to more sophisticated questions about what’s funny and why. I haven’t read their work yet, but, based on the number of times I answered, “Is it okay if we quote someone saying ‘fuck’?” I’m intimidated and afraid.

Were I writing the essay, I might argue similarly, that humor is inherently transgressive. It must cross a line or elude what’s “usual” or “acceptable” to hit its mark—but, if true, where does that leave stodgy (and older) professorial types like me? Does assigning a work as humor disqualify it as funny immediately?

My class, in their defense, puts up with me. My misguided enthusiasm, they communicate, is occasionally quaint and charming. I can’t help feeling a failure, however. Maybe an explained joke can’t be funny, but, if so, that truth doesn’t leave me much room to teach. The whole situation leads to a more existential question, “Can anything be taught at all?

Advertisements

7 Comments

Filed under Aesthetics, Aging, Ambition, Apologies, Doubt, Education, Essays, Experiments, High School Teaching, Humor, Identity, Laments, life, Meditations, Play, Rationalizations, Teaching, Thoughts, Work, Worry

7 responses to “On Humor

  1. Pingback: Starting by Finishing | Signals to Attend

  2. Nancy Brown

    I find your dry wit hilarious, and it always leaves me feeling better. I don’t know if I could pin down what I am responding to, but I take satisfaction in knowing that not everyone appreciates what I find to be funny!

    Nancy

    • dmarshall58

      You’re nice. I do think that humor is a sort of rapport, that it ultimately arises from a sympathetic response. I’m happy I have that with you. Your sense of humor always hits me squarely, and I appreciate that.

      DM

  3. This made me laugh. I think humor is definitely linked to the perceived discomfort of others. Thus the laughing.

    • dmarshall58

      I try to engage my class in discussing the targets of humor and whether humor always relies on a sense of superiority, a victory of some kind. The people most gifted at making others laugh, I’m coming to realize, have the self-awareness to accept their imperfection. They open themselves up to being laughed at… which, come to think of it, might be something too rare to organize a high school class around.

      Thanks for commenting, DM

  4. Political satirist and entertainer Mark Russell wants his epitaph to read “He was a comedian; it was not the first time he died.”

    • dmarshall58

      Oh, but what a death. I’m trying to endow this experience with meaning. My own epitaph might read, “If earnestness counts for anything, he was… okay.”

      Thanks for commenting. DM

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s